Six Public Speaking Tips from Toyota’s Wil James

Some people are naturals are public speaking. Most public relations professionals probably wish that the leaders of their organizations fit into that category. But as hard as many PR pros try, sometimes it’s an uphill battle to get our bosses comfortable and natural in front of a crowd. It’s an important goal, as a confident, comfortable speaker is credible, and a credibility is priceless for any organization that is trying to deliver a message.

Wil James

I recently had the chance to hear a presentation from Wil James, president of Toyota manufacturing in Kentucky, and that man is a natural. Here are six things I picked up from his presentation that every public relations pro should share with his/her leaders.

1. Practice Just because you’re a natural, that doesn’t mean you don’t have to practice. James had his public relations guy running the slides and he never had to ask for a slide to change and he always knew what slide was showing behind him. He spoke confidently and the two of them moved through the presentation flawlessly.

2. Chill Out. Practicing also gives you the confidence to be yourself. James spoke in a very natural tone and used his natural dialect. He was funny and endearing, which no one ever is if they’re focusing too hard on the material – or just reading the slides.

Toyota's Wil James shows his public speaking skills at the Blue Grass Unite function in Central Kentucky.

Wil James speaking at the Blue Grass Army Depot

3. Easy on the Details. I’m sure there are a million things going on at Toyota that Mr. James could have spoken about for hours, but he didn’t. Knowing that his audience wasn’t going to be writing a novel about Toyota operations, he kept his presentation brief and high-level. That said, when someone did ask for details about Toyota’s new initiative to provide power to the plant by using landfill gas, he provided them.

4. Stay in Your Lane That said, sometimes a public speaker might get a question outside his or her purview. When that happens, it isn’t time to promote yourself or make something up. “I don’t know” is always a good answer if you promise to get back to someone with more info.

When James was asked about the future of the hybrid, he said, “I can’t speak for Toyota, but I think…”

5. Ixnay on the I. As far as I know, Wil James hasn’t had a single idea or initiative in his position. That’s because he never used the word, “I.” Everything was “we.” That’s good because it helps the morale of his team and kept his audience from thinking he was pompous.

6. Connect. When James realized he didn’t need his microphone to be heard, he stepped out from behind the podium, removing the obstacle between himself and his audience. He asked the audience questions, spoke directly to people and told a couple of decent jokes.

Take a deep breath – Montel is breathing incorrectly

Those Montel Williams commercials for Money Mutual really annoy me.

It has nothing to do with predatory lending or anything like that, though it certainly is a field worthy of  disdain. It has to do with Montel’s shoulders.

His shoulders.

I looked for the commercial on YouTube but I can’t find it. If you really want to see what I’m talking about, turn on Spike TV for five minutes or so and the commercial will come on at least twice (love those Star Wars marathons). Every time Montel inhales, his shoulders come up. Violently. No big deal, right? Actually it is. It’s a sign that Montel has no idea how to breathe.

Your lungs aren’t in your shoulders and neither is your diaphragm. That’s one reason not to breathe with your shoulders. Another is that your shoulders aren’t strong enough to help you breathe. Watch how quickly Montel’s shoulders fall once he starts talking; it’s immediate, but he keeps on talking after they fall. That’s because his shoulders aren’t helping at all.

What’s the big deal? This: Breathing is an essential part of life. You can last a lot longer without food or water than you can without air. Aside from that, proper breathing is also a tool to help you relax, which is especially important is stressful situations.

So, to do it properly, you just emply different muscle groups — most important being your abdominals. Here is a simple drill:

Sit in a chair with your back straight. Now grip the sides of the seat of your chair with your hands and try taking a breath while maintaining your grip. You should notice that, since you can’t lift your shoulders, your stomach will expand as you inhale. That’s what you’re looking for. Breathe deeply and hold it, then exhale slowly. Do it all very very slowly.

For you aspiring broadcasters or anyone looking to improve their resonance, incorporate this drill with some stretching. Take a deep breath and hold it, then open your mouth a little and tilt your head to one side so your ear comes close to your shoulder (don’t open your mouth wide and don’t raise your shoulder to your ear). Then return to center and repeat to the other side. Try going forward and backward as well. This will help stretch the muscles in your neck and your oral cavity, making your voice a little more resonant.

And next time you feel stressed, take a deep breath the correct way. You’ll notice a difference.